January 8, 2013
motherjones:

The Pentagon is blocking LGBT and progressive websites, but not their conservative counterparts. Does your favorite blog make the censorship list?

motherjones:

The Pentagon is blocking LGBT and progressive websites, but not their conservative counterparts. Does your favorite blog make the censorship list?

January 6, 2013
upworthy:

Proof That Record Companies Are Stealing From Artists And What YOU Can Do About It: Lester Chambers was a mega-profitable musician. The problem was he wasn’t the one getting the profit. For decades the music industry had a stranglehold on which songs got recorded and which artists got paid. All that is changing thanks to a few entrepreneurs and the Internet. Watch the video here.

upworthy:

Proof That Record Companies Are Stealing From Artists And What YOU Can Do About It: Lester Chambers was a mega-profitable musician. The problem was he wasn’t the one getting the profit. For decades the music industry had a stranglehold on which songs got recorded and which artists got paid. All that is changing thanks to a few entrepreneurs and the Internet. Watch the video here.

April 30, 2012
shortformblog:

George Zimmerman’s legal team begins full-scale social media campaign
Attorney Mark O’Mara says the campaign was launched in an effort to discredit fake websites and profiles. Zimmerman, whose first website netted him over $200,000 in donations, now has a virtual presence on Twitter and Facebook, as well as a much more polished site. All three are being maintained by O’Mara who, in his first post online, said he understands “it is unusual for a legal defense to maintain a social media presence on behalf of a defendant, but we also acknowledge that this is a very unusual case.” source
Follow ShortFormBlog: Tumblr, Twitter, Facebook

Is it wrong to wish hackers or Anonymous would go after his site?

shortformblog:

Attorney Mark O’Mara says the campaign was launched in an effort to discredit fake websites and profiles. Zimmerman, whose first website netted him over $200,000 in donations, now has a virtual presence on Twitter and Facebook, as well as a much more polished site. All three are being maintained by O’Mara who, in his first post online, said he understands “it is unusual for a legal defense to maintain a social media presence on behalf of a defendant, but we also acknowledge that this is a very unusual case.” source

Follow ShortFormBlog: Tumblr, Twitter, Facebook

Is it wrong to wish hackers or Anonymous would go after his site?

March 31, 2012
Clemency for Garry T. Allen

shortformblog:

kohenari:

The National Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty is taking to Twitter to urge Oklahoma’s Governor Mary Fallin to follow the recommendation of the Oklahoma Pardon and Parole Board to grant clemency to Garry T. Allen:

It is very rare for the Oklahoma Pardon and Parole Board to recommend clemency for a person facing execution, but they did exactly that by a vote of 4 to 1 in the case of Garry T. Allen, who is scheduled to be executed by the State of Oklahoma on Thursday, April 12, 2012 for his murder of Gail Titsworth. The many reasons for granting clemency that attracted four votes of the pardon and parole board, including that of a former prosecutor who consistently votes to deny clemency in almost all cases, have only grown over time.

Governor Fallin has stated that she won’t grant clemency to Mr. Allen. NCADP is urging people to sign this petition that urges her to reconsider and then to tweet this to their Twitter followers:

#Oklahoma P&P Board rarely recommends mercy, but it did for 4/12 execution of Garry Allen. http://bit.ly/GZ4H2w 2 take action! #deathpenalty

More information about the case, along with the petition to Governor Fallin, can be found here.

Clemency has been recommended for Allen already; the governor doesn’t want to follow through however. Think this is a mistake on the governor’s part? Get involved.

March 8, 2012

theatlanticvideo:

A Short History of the Animated GIF

PBS’s Off Book web series investigates the evolution of the Internet’s favorite meme-making medium, the Graphics Interchange Format, introduced by CompuServe in 1987.

(via theatlantic)

February 2, 2012

maryphillipssandy:

Speaking of art and the internet: My NYC office is looking for a p/t designer to work in-house, M-F in the afternoons, starting very soon. It’s an entry-level gig and the primary requirement is excellence in Photoshop. Hands-on design experience necessary (college/internships OK); designing for digital media a huge plus; CMS experience nice but not necessary. This person will work closely with our senior designers, producers and editors to create all manner of design assets for the web, mobile and apps. S/he will also work with me on a project so if you are hate-following my Tumblr you might not enjoy this.

Anyway, if this sounds like something you can do and would like to do, please send your resume and relevant links (portfolio, online projects, etc.) to me via comedydigital at gmail.

Signal boost.

January 25, 2012
How to Run a Business That Doesn’t Suck: The Hank and John Green Rules

wilwheaton:

fishingboatproceeds:

So Hank and I run or help run several businesses at the moment: Vidcon, DFTBA Records, the juggernaut that is 2-D Glasses, ecogeek, vlogbrothers, scishow, and crashcourse, as well as administering the nonprofit Foundation to Decrease Worldsuck. These are not huge businesses or anything (and in some cases are not even profitable), but many of them have employees and revenue and function like any other business, so recently Hank and I have developed some Rules for Running a Business That Doesn’t Suck, which we thought we’d share.

Rule 1: Don’t be a dick. This is the governing law of the Internet, as created by the great Wil Wheaton, and we try to apply it to our businesses. Not being a dick mostly means treating your clients and customers respectfully, and focusing on creating value rather than creating profit, and generally being reasonably kind and personable when it comes to business relationships.

Rule 2: Increase Awesome or Decrease Suck. If an idea won’t increase world awesome or decrease worldsuck, we won’t do it. (And if we’re doing something that no longer feels like it is increasing awesome or decreasing suck, we stop doing it.)

Rule 3: Minimize lawyering. Hank and I tend to lose interest in any endeavor when a lot of lawyers become involved. Basically, if we require lawyers other than our cousin Mike or the people he works with, we don’t do it.

Rule 4: Employ more people per dollar of revenue than PepsiCo. This is very important to us. So one of the emerging metrics for a company’s “success” is revenue generated per employee. PepsiCo generates more than $196,728 in revenue per employee. (That may seem ludicrously high, but it’s much lower than many companies: Google generates $1,900,000 every year per employee.) The thinking goes that successful companies generate a lot of money per employee. Our thinking is that it is both good business and good citizenship to invest revenue in new employees.

Rule 5: Keep promises. We try to keep promises even when they are very inconvenient and expensive to keep, such as when Amazon Germany ships out a thousand unsigned preorders of your new book even though you signed more than enough copies for them to ship to their customers

Rule 6: Pay tops out at 10x average worker pay. Pretty simple, really: The highest paid employees of a company shouldn’t make more than 10 times the average employee’s pay. (Current estimates in the US indicate CEOs make between 185 and 310 times more than the average worker.) Capping this at a multiple of ten means everyone is invested in seeing the company grow and succeed.

Rule 7: Have awesome customers. If you don’t like the people who watch and read and wear the stuff you make, then you will not have any fun. Speaking of which…

Rule 8: Have fun. Our grandfather wrote thousands of lists in his life—grocery lists, lists of business ideas, pros and cons of taking different jobs. Almost all of his lists ended “Have fun!” We think this is good advice.

And I thought I couldn’t like Hank and John more than I already did. This is fantastic advice, and I’m honored to be included in it.

December 17, 2011
"The fact that there was any debate over whether to call in experts on such a matter should tell you something about the integrity of Congress. It’d be one thing if legitimate technical questions directed at the bill’s supporters weren’t met with either silence or veiled accusations that the other side was sympathetic to piracy. Yet here we are with a group of elected officials openly supporting a bill they can’t explain, and having the temerity to suggest there’s no need to “bring in the nerds” to suss out what’s actually on it… The chilling takeaway of this whole debacle was the irrefutable air of anti-intellectualism; that inescapable absurdity that we have members of Congress voting on a technical bill who do not posses any technical knowledge on the subject and do not find it imperative to recognize those who do.

This used to be funny, but now it’s really just terrifying. We’re dealing with legislation that will completely change the face of the internet and free speech for years to come. Yet here we are, still at the mercy of underachieving Congressional know-nothings that have more in common with the slacker students sitting in the back of math class than elected representatives. The fact that some of the people charged with representing us must be dragged kicking and screaming out of their complacency on such matters is no longer endearing — it’s just pathetic and sad."

Joshua Kopstein, Dear Congress, It’s No Longer OK To Not Know How The Internet Works (via drinkyourjuice)

This friends, is the most important article you’ll read today.  (via shortformblog)

(via shortformblog)

August 30, 2010

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